First Rectifier: Cross Bite Splint with Lateral Molar Lever Effect

first splint

Fot the first bite that we registered with the Starecta method into the fresh resin of the Rectifier, we followed a specific strategy.

As you can see from the following picture, the patient presents at the beginning of treatment a phase 5 collapse of the skeletal structure and an important compression of the brain stem at the level of C5-C6-C7 on the left side of his neck. We consider that the brain stem compression is the origin of the dystonic symptoms. Therefore, we decided that the main priority is to alliviate the pressure on the brain stem by moving the weight of the skull away from the left side of the neck.

Cervcal Dystonia: postural colapse affects the Brain Stem

Cervcal Dystonia: postural colapse affects the Brain Stem

In order to move the barycentre of the wieght of the skull away from the left side of the neck and towards the center of the body, we deicided to take advantage of the Molar Lever effect to produce lateral forces. (For a detailed description of the mechanics of the Molar Lever, please read this Post)

In the next picture, you can see the end result of the first Rectifier to treat this case.

lateraleversplint

We have registered on the splint resin inside pits on the left side and outside pits on the right side. Thus, the contact between the opposing dental arches is achieved with the lingual maxillary cusp on the left side and the buccal maxillary cusps on the right side. The occlusion scheeme that we achieve with this methos is technically called “Gerber Lingualized Occlusion with Cross Bite.”

In the following pictures you can see the ortophedic effect of this bite, which uses the right dental arch as the fulcrum of a lever to move the mandible and the skull laterally towards a more central position while maintaining weight bareing contacts on both arches. The reusult that we are trying to achieve is to produce a stronger force stretching the cervical vertebrae and lifting the back-side of the skull on the left side than on the right side.

comparesplint1

By comparing the two pictures, you can appreciate that with the Rectifier the mandible is centered, the mouth is alligned with the pupil of the eyes and the line connecting the pupils of the eyes is paralleal to the line of the plane of occlusion.

We consider appropriate to maintain this first Rectifier for two weeks to allow a reasonable lap of time to the muscles and legaments to react to the orthopedic forces igenerated by the splint and to adapt to a more centered and elevated postion of the skull. In two weeks we intend to register a new bite on the splint.

POST DATA

We have recently found an article describing the case of a Parkinson’s patient who was treated with the same kind of cross-bite orthopedic producing splint. The tremors resolved.
image

Related Posts:

 

“About the Causes of Dystonia”

“The Molar Lever”

“Postural Colapse and Dental Arches”

“Treatment of Dystonia”

“Beginning of Treatment”

4 thoughts on “First Rectifier: Cross Bite Splint with Lateral Molar Lever Effect

  1. Hi Marcello,
    i have been using the rectifier for 3 months now, with success. However, I do have a narrow left dental arch. Would you recommend that I try a cross bite splint?
    your blog is an excellent resource!
    Armando

    Like

    • Yes. I have the same problem: an assymetric maxillary arch with one narrower than the other. The cross bite splint helps. Most patients who develop neurological symptoms like Dystonia have cranial asymmetries at all levels.and all planes. One other appliance that is used to treat Dystonia in conjunction with a lower splint by such he geniuses as Dr. Stack and Dr. Brown is the ALF (advanced lightwire force). I will soon write about it.

      Like

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